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Collection Development Policy


Introduction
Selections
Scope of Coverage of Collection - By Subject and SAS
Scope of Coverage of Collection - By Jurisdiction
Specialized Collections
Gifts
Weeding/Deaccessioning


I. Introduction

This plan defines the collection policy of the Sacramento County Public Law Library (SCPLL) and to provide a blueprint for the maintenance and expansion of the Library's collection in all formats. The policy should assist those responsible for selecting materials for the collection to understand the philosophy and rationale that guides the development of the collection. With this plan, SCPLL will be able to allocate acquisition funds wisely, shape a strong collection, and inform the community of the nature and purpose of the collection.

This statement reflects the current needs of the SCPLL community. As our Library's programs grow and change, this plan will be reviewed periodically and revised to meet any future needs.

  1. Mission Statement
    The SCPLL Collection Development Team's mission is to develop and maintain a collection that will provide outstanding support for the practical legal information needs of our patrons, based upon the types of legal issues our patrons are likely to encounter. The Law Library's primary patrons are members of the Sacramento County legal community and county residents representing themselves in legal matters. To the extent possible, the Law Library also supports the legal research needs of non-Sacramento County residents representing themselves or others in legal matters.

  2. Objectives
    1. Provide access to legal information to county resident as mandated by sections 6300 through 6365 of the California Business and Professions Code.
    2. Acquire and maintain major primary and secondaryCalifornia and U.S. Federal legal works.
    3. Collaborate with other California county law libraries and the state law library, other libraries in the County and in California, and libraries outside the State to the extent possible in order to share resources and provide the SCPLL community with excellent access to legal resources.
    4. Meet or exceed the following library standards and ideals set forth by the library community and incorporated by reference into this document:
      1. Law Library Standards, American Association of Law Libraries, State Court and County Special Interest Section
      2. Code of Ethics, American Association of Law Libraries
      3. Bill of Rights, American Library Association
      4. Freedom to Read Statement
      5. Government Relations Policy, American Association of Law Libraries
    5. Maintain a diverse collection of print and electronic materials including resources targeting both attorneys and those without training in the law

  3. Responsibility
    The Director of the Law Library has final responsibility for the maintenance and development of the Library's collections and services. The Director has delegated some oversight and selection responsibilities to the Collection Development Team. The Collection Development Team includes the Assistant Director for Public Services, the Assistant Director for Support Services, the Support Team's Acquisitions Specialist, and the Public Services Team librarians.
  4. Collecting Levels
    1. Minimal
      Few Selections are made beyond basic works and those of renowned authors in the field.
    2. Basic
      Highly selective collection that introduces and defines the subject and indicates the variety of information that can be found elsewhere. The collection includes selected editions of important works. This type of collection is not sufficiently intensive to support the practice of law in a particular area. Older editions of loose-leafs and treatises will not normally be retained.
    3. Practice
      Selective collection that supports the practice of law in a particular area. Includes a wide range of treatises and practice materials. Reference works and secondary works relating to the subject are selective. Older editions of loose-leafs and treatises will not normally be retained.
    4. Comprehensive
      Extensive collection that supports most research needs. Strives to collect a wide range of treatises and practice materials, and an extensive collection of monographs, periodicals, and government documents. Older editions of looseleafs and treatises may be retained

II. Selections

  1. Process
    The Collection Development Team meets every other week throughout the year. Each librarian member serves as a Subject Area Selector (SAS) for various legal subject areas.

    SASes choose materials from different sources, such as publishers' multi-subject catalogs and blurbs. When Support Team members open Library mail, they place publisher's blurbs, notices and catalogs in a designated box. A designated team member reviews these and distributes to the appropriate SAS. Each SAS should also periodically review publishers catalogs housed outside the Assistant Dir for PS office.

    SASes choose materials from different sources, such as publishers' multi-subject catalogs and blurbs. When Support Team members open Library mail, they place publisher's blurbs, notices and catalogs in a designated box. A designated team member reviews these and distributes to the appropriate SAS. Each SAS should also periodically review publishers catalogs housed outside the Assistant Dir for PS office.

    An SAS who decides to order a new title must create a "purchase request" (PR) in Horizon's Acquisitions module; make a note of the PR number on a print out of a web page, a brochure or other documentation; and give the documentation to the Assistant Dir for SS. In the PR, the selector should note if there is a special location designated for the material, such as Reference or the Self-Help Room, whether an ongoing subscription is needed, whether the item is for Main and/or the Branch, and whether circulating or not. If the selector feels that more than one copy is needed, that information also should be indicated.

    Each selector may request the purchase of items up to $300. If anything costs more than that, bring the item to the meeting for discussion with the team.

    Microform sets typically cost more than $300. All microform purchases are discussed at the meeting.

    Electronic resources merit consideration from many angles and will be brought before the entire team regardless of price.

  2. Tools for Purchasing
    The library has package plans with Nolo (i.e., 2 sets of all general and CA materials), ABA (i.e., certain ABA periodical titles), and Hein (i.e., some periodicals and other titles). Where possible, ongoing subscriptions from other vendors are placed on Standing Order (SO), but not all vendors will set up SO accounts.

    Additional selections may be made from tools such as the followingL
    • Publishers' catalogs, brochures and flyers received in the mail
    • Hein Current Publications in Legal and Related Fields
    • Book reviews professional literature encountered by selectors

  3. Patron Requests
    Requests for material made by any of our patrons shall be considered. We do not make purchases based solely on patron request, but we will investigate and decide whether the item is appropriate for our collection. If possible (without undue difficulty), notify the patron whether the purchase is made or not, and if the patron wishes to borrow the item upon arrival, place a hold when ordering.

  4. Selection Standards and Criteria
    The following general criteria are used to evaluate potential new purchases:
    1. Books
      1. A practitioner-oriented or law for the layperson approach is preferred over scholarly/academic approaches. Exceptions may be made when no other materials have been published on a topic of current interest or importance, which we know to be of use to our patrons.
      2. Strong preference is given to titles from reputable publishers and, where relevant, university presses.
      3. Author is known for reputation in field or for quality of previously published work.
      4. Compilations of primary law, bibliographies, and anthologies normally are not collected.
      5. Fills in gap in collection or enhances an already substantial collection that is being developed at a comprehensive level
      6. U.S. law school faculty publications may be purchased if they are practitioner-oriented.
      7. Frequency, manner, and cost of updating
      8. Availability of material in other formats, especially online

    2. Periodicals
      1. The Library subscribes to Hein Online, and therefore has access to the materials provided by that vendor.
      2. The Library collects in print all substantive journals produced by the California law schools. The Collection Development team determines which print copies of the leading non-California, US law schools to collect based on a variety of criteria, such as electronic availability, various "frequently cited" lists and circulation statistics.
      3. Commercially-produced journals are collected if deemed especially relevant to our collection. Many practitioner- oriented journals are purchased. Journals that consist of reprinted articles from journals we already receive are never purchased.
      4. The Library collects the major journal(s) from the Sacramento, California and American Bar Associations. Substantive journals published by Sections, Committees, Divisions, etc., of these Bar Associations are collected if deemed especially relevant to our collection. Journals from other states' and counties' Bar Associations are rarely collected.

    3. Audio/Video
      1. Acquire commercial audio materials, especially CA MCLE and practice-oriented training tapes. CD is the preferred format if available.
      2. Purchase CA MCLE and practice-oriented training videotapes and DVDs. DVD is the preferred format if available.

    4. DVD/CD-ROM/Diskettes
      1. Stand-alone DVDs, CD-ROMs and diskettes are not desired formats to purchase as a separate item unless the material contained is essential and not available in any other source.
      2. If print materials have accompanying CDs, DVDs or diskettes available, library purchases both.

    5. Web Resources
      1. Non-legal electronic resources will be purchased by the library only if the cost is low and the usage is expected to be high.
      2. Legal electronic resources will be evaluated by the Collection Development team prior to purchase. Cost and uniqueness of material, as well as database design and usefulness to the library's patrons will be considered. Any selector is welcome to bring a resource to the attention of the Collection Development team and request a trial.
      3. License agreements that are acceptable to the library must be obtained for each electronic product. The Assistant Director for Support Services and the Assistant Director for Public Services will negotiate the license agreements as needed, with the assistance of the Director when necessary. Major considerations are:
        1. Allowances for concurrent users at Main and the Branch
        2. Allowances for walk-in public traffic access inside the library.
        3. Allowances for library members to access from the library's website.
        4. IP address recognition rather than passwords
        5. No liability clauses that force the library to take responsibility for the abuse of the database by a user
        6. Availability of usage statistics
        7. Legal matters, if they arise, will be conducted in the state of California.
        8. No restrictions about how the library publicizes or links to the product on its web site
        9. No restrictions on ability to Inter-Library Loan or email information from the databases.

    6. Microform
      1. Materials in microformat will be considered when the size, expense, infrequency of use, or unavailability in other formats precludes their addition in print or digital formats.
      2. The Library does not have an extensive microform collection. It is unlikely that we will collect many titles in these formats.

    7. Language
      English and Spanish are preferred languages of the collection. Due to the limited availability of US and California legal materials published in Spanish, our collection in this language is small. However, any relevant US or California legal materials published in Spanish will be collected, as well as relevant legal materials from other countries (i.e., mainly Mexico) in Spanish. Where available, the Library will also consider collecting US legal materials, especially those geared towards the lay public, in other languages prominent in the law library community.

III. Scope of Coverage of Collection - By Subject and SAS

Collection Levels by Subject
The following chart outlines the scope of collection development in U.S. legal subjects.

Subject Areas:

Includes:

Subject Area Selector:

Collecting Levels:

     

California

General

(Gov Docs)

Cal Docs
Microfiche
Primary law received through FDLP

MP

2

1

Administrative Law

Administrative mandamus

MW

4

2

Admiralty Law

Maritime Law

RMM

N/A

1

Alternative Dispute Resolution

Arbitration; Mediation

MP

4

3

Antitrust Law

 

KF

1

1

Appellate Practice

Writs

MP

4

2

Audio/Video/CD-ROM ALL - See Section V. A., Specialized Collections-Audio Visual

Banking Law

 

MW

2

2

Bankruptcy Law

 

KF

2

2

Business Law

Agency Law
Contracts
Franchises
Leases
Partnership
Proprietorship
Transactional
Forms
Secured Transactions

MW

3

3

Branch Library - ALL - See Section V. B., Specialized Collections--Branch

Civil Rights Law

ADA Law
Gay Rights (legal)
1983
Title VII

KB

3

3

Constitutional Law

1st, 2nd amendments
Right to privacy
Commerce, takings clause

KB

3

3

Consumer Law

Consumer Credit
Consumer Protection
Debt Collection
Identity Theft
Personal Property
Lemon Law

RMM

3

3

Corporate Law

Nonprofit Corporations

KB

4

4

Criminal Law

Corrections
Criminal Constitutional Law
Criminal Jury
Instructions
Criminal Procedure
Drunk Driving Law
Law Enforcement
Prisoner's Rights

RMM

3

2

Disability Law

 

KB

4

3

Education Law

 

MW

3

1

Elder Law

 

MW

4

2

Entertainment Law

Art Law
Sports Law

RMM

2

2

Environmental Law

EPA
Land Use
Natural Resources Law
Pollution
Toxic Waste

KF

3

2

Family Law

Adoption
Child Custody
Child Support
Divorce
Domestic Partnerships
Domestic Violence
Elder Law
Emancipation
Marriage
Parentage

MP

4

1

Finding Aids

ALRs
Citators
Digests
Encyclopedias
Words and Phrases

KB

4

2

General and Reference Titles

ALL - See Section V. F., Specialized Collections -- Reference

Government Documents

See Section V. C., Specialized Collections - Government Documents

Healthcare

Healthcare Law Healthcare Facilities
Managed Care
Mental Health Law

KB

4

3

Immigration Law

 

RMM

3

3

Insurance Law

 

KF

3

1

Intellectual Property

Copyright Law
Patent and Trademark

KF

3

3

International Law

Comparative Law
Foreign Law
International Law

MW

1

1

Juvenile Law

Delinquency
Dependency

MW

4

1

Labor and Employment Law

At will employment Contracts
Collective Bargaining
Discrimination (including ADA)
Employment
OSHA
Rights in the workplace
Unemployment Comp
Wages and Hours
Workers Comp

KB

4

3

Landlord Tenant Law

Fair Housing
Unlawful Detainer

KF

4

1

Law Office Management

Client Development
Law Firm Marketing
Legal Business practice

RMM

4

3

Legal Profession

Ethics, legal
Legal Malpractice
Professional Responsibility

RMM

4

3

Military Law, Veterans Law

 

RMM

3

2

Municipal Law

Administrative
Local Government

MW

3

1

Native Americans Law

Federal Recognition
Gaming Law
Tribal Law

JW

4

2

Periodicals

ALL - See Section V. E., Specialized Collections -- Periodicals

Personal Injury Law

Jury Verdicts
Medical Evidence
Products Liability
Medical Malpractice
Valuation Handbooks

KF

4

2

Pre-Trial Practice

Discovery

MP

4

2

Primary Sources (excluding gov docs)

Administrative Regulations
Case Reporters
County Codes
Court Rules
Municipal Ordinances
Statutes
Statutory Constr.

KB

4

4

Probate

Conservatorship
Decedent's estates
Guardianship

KB

4

2

Public Benefits Law

Public Health Medical, Medicaid)
Public Welfare and Assistance
Social Security

KB

4

3

Real Property Law

Common Interest Dev
Construction Law
Foreclosure
Home Owners Ass'ns
Mechanics Liens
Real Estate Law
Takings Clause
Zoning & Planning

KF

4

3

Securities

 

KB

1

1

Self Help Room

ALL - See Section V. G., Specialized Collections - Self Help Room

Small Claims

 

MW

4

1

Spanish Materials

 

KF

4

4

Staff Collection

ALL - See Section V. H., Specialized Collections -- Staff

Tax Law

Federal Tax Law
State Tax Law
Local Tax Law

KB

3

2

Technology Law

Computer Law
Internet Law
Telecommunications

KF

3

2

Tort Law

Government
Tort Liability Practice

KF

4

2

Traffic Law

 

MW

4

1

Trial Practice

Evidence
Jury Instructions
Witnesses

MP

4

3

Trusts and Estates Law

Estate Planning
Trusts
Wills

KB

4

2

The following chart outlines the collection development areas by SAS:

Subject Areas - by SAS (6/12/08)

Staff Collection

ALL

N/A

1

       

Native Am Law

JW

4

2

       

Civil Rights Law

KB

3

3

Constitutional

KB

3

3

Corporate Law

KB

4

4

Disability Law

KB

4

3

Finding Aids

KB

4

2

Healthcare

KB

4

3

Labor & Empl

KB

4

3

Primary Sources (& Stat Constr)

KB

4

4

Probate

KB

4

2

Public Benefits Law

KB

4

3

Securities

KB

1

1

Tax Law

KB

3

2

Trusts & Estates

KB

4

2

       
       

Antitrust Law

KF

1

1

Bankruptcy Law

KF

2

2

Environmental

KF

3

2

Insurance Law

KF

3

1

IP

KF

3

3

Landlord Tenant Law

KF

4

1

Personal Injury

KF

4

2

Real Property

KF

4

3

Spanish Materials

KF

4

4

Technology Law

KF

3

2

Tort Law

KF

4

2

 

(Gov Docs)

MP

2

1

ADR

MP

4

3

Appellate Practice

MP

4

2

Family Law

MP

4

1

Pre-Trial Practice

MP

4

2

Trial Practice

MP

4

3

Administrative

MW

4

2

Banking Law

MW

2

2

Business Law

MW

3

3

Education Law

MW

3

1

Elder Law

MW

4

2

International Law

MW

1

1

Juvenile Law

MW

4

1

Municipal Law

MW

3

1

Small Claims

MW

4

1

Traffic Law

MW

4

1

Admiralty Law

RMM

N/A

1

Consumer Law

RMM

3

3

Criminal Law

RMM

3

2

Entertainment

RMM

2

2

Immigration Law

RMM

3

3

Law Office Management

RMM

4

3

Legal Profession

RMM

4

3

Military Law, Veterans Law

RMM

3

2

 



IV.  Overview/Scope of Coverage of Collection - By Jurisdiction

  1. California
    1. Session laws, statutory compilations, court reporters, administrative code and regulations, court rules, jury instructions, administrative opinions, attorney general opinions, legislative materials, digests, and California Shepard's citations are collected at a comprehensive level. California statutes, case reporters and digests are duplicated in the Branch collection.
    2. Practice materials, treatises on California law, MCLE materials, and finding aids are purchased at a comprehensive level.
    3. County codes of Sacramento, Placer, San Joaquin, Sutter, Yolo and El Dorado Counties are maintained for local interest. Also collected are municipal codes for Sacramento, Citrus Heights, Galt, and Folsom. Other local municipal codes may be collected as available.

  2. United States
    1. Session laws, statutory compilations, court reporters containing cases deemed for publication by the courts, the Code of Federal Regulations, and the Federal Register are collected and maintained at a comprehensive level.
    2. Court rules publications, jury instructions, administrative opinions (in a variety of formats), legislative materials (in a variety of formats), encyclopedias, and restatements are collected at a comprehensive level. Shepard's Citators for Federal materials are only available electronically through our Lexis subscription.
    3. West's Federal Digest and Supreme Court Digest is collected. The Supreme Court Digest, Lawyer's Edition is not.
  3. Other U.S. States
    1. Annotated statutory compilations and advance legislative services are maintained for Nevada, Oregon, and Washington. Regulatory compilations are not collected.
    2. Court Rules are purchased for Oregon, Washington, and Nevada if they are not included in the code sets.
    3. Jury instructions are not purchased. State Bar journals are collected in accordance with our Periodicals collection policies.
    4. Subscriptions to regional reporters and digests are not maintained.
    5. Treatises and practice materials for other states are purchased at a very basic level, usually as a result of a special interest.

  4. Other Foreign Jurisdictions
    1. No primary materials for other foreign jurisdictions are maintained in print. Translations of codes or portions of codes that are of particular subject interest may be purchased selectively.
    2. English-language secondary materials may be selected if the topics coincide with a subject area of emphasis within our collection and there is interest among patrons. Treatises in English about foreign legal systems may also be collected when desirable.

  5. International Law
    1. Treaties
       Print and microform subscriptions to treaty services are not maintained. Existing copies of print and microform versions will be retained indefinitely. An online subscription to Hein's Treaties and Agreements Library is maintained.
    2. Treatises
      Treatises and practice materials for international organizations are rarely purchased at a very basic level, usually as a result of a special interest.


V. Specialized Collections

The library maintains collections that are unique in format, purpose or location. However, the aggregated subject materials in these collections make are microcosms of the library as a whole; individual subject area specialists have responsibility for collecting and evaluating the parts of these collections that fall in their subject areas.

Any member of the team can propose a project to improve the integrity or accessibility of a specialized collection as a whole. If the team agrees to the project, one team member will volunteer or be appointed to coordinate the project to its completion

The Government Documents collection is an exception to this approach. A single librarian is charged with oversight of this collection, described below in Section V. C

  1. Audio Visual
    The Audio Visual collection includes audio tapes, CDs, video tapes, DVDs, and program handbooks. All are available for use inside the library and many circulate.
  2. Branch Collection
    A branch of the law library is housed within the William R. Ridgeway Family Relations Courthouse because this facility is located several miles from the Main library. The purpose of the branch library is to make conveniently available primary and secondary sources and self-help materials that support attorney and pro se research and practice in matters heard at this facility:
    1. Domestic violence, civil harassment, workplace violence, elder and dependent adult abuse
    2. Family Law (dissolution and associated actions; parentage; adoption)
    3. Probate
      1. Wills and estate planning
      2. Conservatorship
      3. Guardianship
    4. Juvenile Dependency

In addition, the branch library collects materials that facilitate research and practice in the matters heard at the Carole Miller Justice Center, located nearby.

  1. Landlord Tenant and Unlawful Detainer
  2. Small Claims
  3. Traffic Court

In addition to these specialty subject areas, the branch library collects materials that are essential to facilitating associated transactional or civil trial and appellate procedures. Although much of the Branch collection is comprised of additional copies of materials in the Main library, the Branch library may include unique secondary sources and practice guides that are deemed essential to maintaining the level three Practice collection designation of the subject area practice needs.

Primary source print collections at the Branch library include up to date relevant desktop codes, the annotated California codes sets, official case reporters, and relevant rules of court for the state and counties. Secondary print sources include Cal Jur, and the Witkin Summary and Procedure treatises, attorney practice guides specific to the subject matters listed above, and relevant self help materials by reputable publishers.

The reference collection is comprised of resources deemed essential to providing specific and current information quickly and accurately to attorney and pro se patrons. To that end, the reference collection contains duplicate copies of many of the Main library's dictionaries, directories, forms manuals, and other factual materials required for the efficient completion of tasks related to court pleading and practice at these two remote facilities, scaled down where appropriate to fit the limited subject area framework. In addition, Branch librarians may agree to collect for reference additional copies of frequently consulted self help materials.

Branch collection and reference titles are evaluated for currency and continued relevance to patron need by the Branch SAS with the input, support and consultation of other team members. Titles that have become out-of-date or are considered to have no further potential for use among the Branch library constituencies are withdrawn by consensus. 

The networked computers at the Branch library provide users' equity of access to the full menu of electronic resources available to patrons of the Main law library. Print purchases are considered at the intersection of just-in-time need and electronic availability.

  1. Government Documents
    The highly structured and detailed nature of depository programs for collecting government publications requires that there be one librarian solely responsible for overseeing the acquisitions, management and processing of this specialized collection. Individual subject area specialists may be consulted during open selection periods, when there is the opportunity to add or remove titles from the depository list. 
    1. Federal Depository Library Program
      The law library is a selective depository of publications distributed by the United States Government as part of the Federal Depository Library Program. As such, materials are selected that support the general collection priorities of the library and that meet the government information needs of our primary clientele. The library selects a portion of the titles listed on the FDLP's "Suggested Core Collection for Law Libraries." The library's selections are reviewed annually, with a zero-based review conducted every other year.

      The library maintains a mostly current, 5-year collection with a few retrospective holdings. Most government documents are shelved in the compact shelving, with some heavily-used titles integrated into the library's general collection. Access to the library's holdings is provided through the online catalog and, when applicable, links are included to the electronic version of the titles.
    2. California Library Depository Act
      The library is a selective depository law library. Under the CLDA, libraries have limited ability to select documents, and no ability to deselect documents. Documents are sent to the law library based on its registration as a "selective depository law library." The library is required to keep basic legal state documents, which include legislative bills, legislative committee hearings and reports, legislative journals, statutes, administrative reports, the California Code of Regulations, annual reports of state agencies, and other legal materials.

      As part of the depository program, the library also receives some general state documents. The library is not required to keep these types of documents, but retains any that are deemed beneficial to the collection.

  2. Historical
    The library does not actively collect for retrospective or chronological coverage. Nor does the library actively collect materials for their historical significance. The Historical collection is developed by a process of retention of superseded materials and through unsolicited gifts as appropriate. The collection's primary purpose is to make available core information and content that might be cited or referred to in subsequent or collateral research or in court documents. Also, materials may be retained in the Historical collection when they are unique in scope or coverage and therefore difficult to replace.

    Historical collection materials are classified as non-circulating.

    Superseded California-specific materials retained for the Historical collection may include attorney and court directories, practice guides, treatises and encyclopedias, selected annotated and desktop codes, decisions of specialized courts, boards, commissions and agencies, regulations, court rules, jury instructions and municipal codes.

    General and Federal materials selected for the Historical collection may include prior editions of major treatises and practice guides, and federal bench directories.

    The initial decision to place an item or set of items in the Historical collection is made by the subject area selector after soliciting input from the collection development team.

    Weeding of this collection is based on space considerations and or the determination that an item or set of items holds no further qualitative value for the library's patrons. The subject area selector(s) work in consultation with the collection development team to make such determinations.

  3. Periodicals
    The library maintains a collection of law reviews, professional journals, and substantive legal newsletters to supplement the print and electronic resources available in the library. These periodicals enhance current awareness and support the research efforts of library patrons.

  4. Reference Collection
    The Reference collection comprises selective legal and non-legal resources intended for rapid determination of information or explanation. These resources, both print and electronic, include dictionaries, directories, biographical sources, research guides, almanacs, atlases, bibliographies, statistical sourcebooks, and citation manuals.

    Additional copies of frequently used material, such as self-help books, are purchased for the Reference collection. These materials are located in the Reference collection so that reference librarians may be more readily available to assist patrons in using these sources.

    Because it is essential to have current material in the Reference collection, a designated librarian on the Collection Development Team continually monitors current awareness resources to insure that the library holds the most recent edition of a particular item. For resources not updated by the publisher, the resource is evaluated for withdrawal no later than five years after publication. Where appropriate, a more up-to-date alternative published resource is sought. Online resources are considered in evaluating titles, as they are often more up to date than published materials, particularly for materials such as directories.

    All items withdrawn from the Reference collection are evaluated on a case-by-case basis for inclusion in the library's other collections. Those resources that possess significance for later historical research are retained.

  5. Self-Help Room
    Items purchased for the Self-Help Room include Nolo Press books, Sphinx books, nutshells, hornbooks, a legal encyclopedia, and materials in selected areas of emphasis particularly helpful for those representing themselves in legal matters. Other materials housed in the Self-Help Room, for reasons of convenient access by browsing, are consumer guides, consumer pamphlets, and consumer periodicals. Spanish language materials are also housed in the Self-Help Room. Selected titles may be duplicated in the general collection or in other library collections. Current editions of Nolo Press books, Thomson-West nutshells and hornbooks, and selected hornbooks from other publishers are purchased for the Self-Help Room. Older editions are removed and discarded for sale. Areas of special emphasis in the Self-Help Room due to high demand are:
    1. Legal research
    2. Divorce
    3. Landlord/tenant
    4. Small claims
    5. Real estate

Because it is essential to have current and relevant materials in the Self-Help Room collection, all Subject Area Specialists will constantly monitor the collection and recommend additional purchases or withdrawing items from the library's collection

  1. Staff Collection
    Print and audio-visual materials are collected as a resource library for staff in areas of interest in career development, technology, and developments in the law library field. Materials typically include books, journals, and recordings of lectures from professional conferences.

VI. Gifts

Gifts of either cash or library materials are accepted provided there are no conditions attached and the materials conform to the selection guidelines. The Director of the Law Library and the Assistant Directors for Public and Support Services will consider offers of gifts and respond to the prospective donor accordingly. The library will determine the housing, classification, and circulation of all gifts and retain the right to dispose of gifts at any time deemed appropriate. The library will not appraise the value of any gift. A list of donated items will be supplied to the donor by the library if requested.


VII. Weeding/Deaccessioning

  1. Overview
    The SCPLL Collection Development Team's mission includes developing a collection that supports the practical legal information needs of our patrons. Both current and retrospective materials are relevant for this purpose. However, there are a number of factors that contribute to decisions about the retention of certain items in the collection. These factors are:
    1. Unnecessary duplication
    2. Physical condition of materials
    3. Level of use
    4. Obsolescence
    5. Space limitations
    6. Qualitative value (using criteria similar to those for selection)

  2. Duplication
    With the exception of some primary California materials, and high-use titles valued for their currency, such as CEB and TRG practice sets, in general there should be no duplication in the main collection. When there is duplication of titles at least one set of a title shall circulate, and one title shall be non-circulating.

  3. Physical Condition
    No item in such a fragile state that it is unusable by a regular patron is maintained in the collection unless it is irreplaceable and of great value. If that is the case, then the item will be retained in an area such as the Historical Collection, where it will be handled with utmost care. Some materials may be preserved indefinitely with low use if they are housed in phase boxes in the general collection, and items that fall into this category are so handled if they meet other criteria for maintaining a presence in the collection.

  4. Level of Use
    If items receive little or no use and are not relevant to the collection development plan, they may be removed from the collection. Items that potentially fall into this category are older non-legal works in areas outside our patrons' interests that may be obtained elsewhere locally.

  5. Obsolescence
    While many items retain historical value as they age, some do not. Also, the collection development plan identifies the areas in which the library does not automatically retain historical materials (collection levels 1-3). Selection for weeding by this criterion generally is done in conjunction with another criterion.

  6. Space Limitations
    In general, weeding due to space limitations will be done only if other weeding factors apply, such as the level of use, physical condition, or obsolescence.

  7. Qualitative Value
    If items of little or no qualitative value exist in the collection and would not be selected if they were current publications, they will be discarded.

  8. Weeding Guidelines
    If a book is older than 10 years, consider discarding the book subject to the following guidelines:
    1. Do not discard any reporters.
    2. Do not discard any opinion sets (e.g.: ethic opinions).
    3. Do not discard any codes.
    4. Do not discard any version of any standards. (e.g.: Uniform Building Codes and Standards).
    5. Do not discard any version of any model or uniform codes (e.g.: Uniform Building Codes and Standards, Uniform Fire Codes).
    6. Do not discard any annual current awareness or development guides.
    7. If there is more than one edition of a treatise, practice guide, or form book on the shelf, leave only the current edition on the shelf.
    8. Check inside the front cover for any instructions which state that the book should not be discarded or that it should be kept until a particular date.


updated 2008